Tuesday, May 2, 2017

May 13th Reading: Madison Smartt Bell

Madison Smartt Bell is best known for his trilogy of novels about Toussaint Louverture and the Haitian Revolution, including All Souls' Rising, which was a finalist for the 1995 National Book Award and the 1996 PEN/Faulkner Award. It also won the 1996 Anisfield-Wolf Award for the best book of the year dealing with matters of race. Bell is a Professor of English at Goucher College in Towson, Maryland, where he was Director of the Creative Writing Program from 1998 to 2004. In addition to many books of fiction and non-fiction, he has published essays and reviews in Harper's, The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Book Review, and The Village Voice. His latest book is Behind the Moon (City Lights Publisher).

Thursday, March 30, 2017

April 15th Readings: Emily Cementina, Carys Davies, Meghan Kenny, and Elise Levine

Emily Cementina received her M.F.A. in fiction from The New School. She teaches first-year writing and literature at CUNY and is a co-host of Sunday Salon, a monthly reading series in New York City. Having finished the most recent draft of her novel, she has taken a break to receive her teaching certification in vinyasa yoga. She looks forward to revising with a new perspective. You can find her work online at fwriction: review.
Carys Davies is the author of two collections of short stories, The Redemption of Galen Pike and Some New Ambush. She is the winner of the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award, the Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize, the Royal Society of Literature’s V.S. Pritchett Memorial Prize, the Society of Authors’ Olive Cook Short Story Award, a Northern Writers’ Award, and is currently a 2016-2017 Cullman Fellow at the New York Public Library. The Redemption of Galen Pike is an IndieNext pick for April 2017. Born in Wales, she usually lives in north-west England
Meghan Kenny is the author of the debut short story collection Love Is No Small Thing (LSU Press, 2017). Her debut novel, The Driest Season, is forthcoming with W.W. Norton in 2018. She has won The Iowa Review Award, has been a scholar at the Bread Loaf and Sewanee Writers’ Conferences, and held the Tickner Writing Fellowship in Baltimore. She lives and teaches in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.
Elise Levine is the author of the story collection Driving Men Mad, and the novels Requests and Dedications and Blue Field. Her work has also appeared in Ploughshares, Blackbird, PANK, The Journey Prize Anthology, the Toronto Star, and Best Canadian Stories, among other publications. She is the recipient of a Canadian National Magazine Award for fiction; awards from the Canada Council for the Arts, the Ontario Arts Council, and the Toronto Arts Council; and residency fellowships from the MacDowell Colony and Yaddo, among others. She currently lives in Baltimore, MD, where she directs the MA in Writing program at Johns Hopkins University.

Readings begin at 7:30 pm, Bird in Hand Coffee Shop, 11 E. 33rd Street, Baltimore. 410-243-0757

Thursday, February 16, 2017

February 25th Readings: Angie Chuang, J. M. Tyree, and Sara Lautman

Angie Chuang is an author and educator from Washington, D.C. Her debut memoir, The Four Words for Home, was published by Willow Books in 2014 as the winner of the Willow Books Literature Awards Grand Prize in Prose. The book won the Independent Publishers Award Bronze Medal for Multicultural Nonfiction and was short-listed for the William Saroyan Prize and the International Rubery Award. Angie's literary nonfiction has appeared in Creative Nonfiction, The Asian American Literary Review, Vela, and several editions of The Best Women's Travel Writing. She is an associate professor of journalism at the American University School of Communication.

J. M. Tyree is the author of Vanishing Streets: Journeys in London (Stanford University Press) and Our Secret Life in the Movies (coauthor Michael McGriff, A Strange Object), which was selected as a Best Book of 2014 by NPR. He is the Nonfiction Editor of New England Review and Distinguished Visiting Professor at VCUarts.






Sara Lautman's drawings have been published by The New Yorker, Jezebel, The Awl, Tablet, Mad Magazine, and The Pitchfork Review, and featured by The Believer and NPR. Her second most recent book of comics essays and stories, The Ultimate Laugh, was published by Tinto Press in 2016 and nominated for an Ignatz award. She is currently at work on a new collection, to be published by Birdcage Bottom Books in Spring 2017. Lautman is comics editor at Okey-Panky, the flash and experimental arm of Electric Literature, and a faculty member at The Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore.

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

January 28th Readings: Jason Diamond, Rion Amilcar Scott, and Katharine Noel

Jason Diamond founded the site Vol. 1 Brooklyn. Vol 1. has since launched Julius Singer Press and curates regular free literary events, including the popular 3-Minute Stories series. He was the editor of the Jewish pop culture website Jewcy.com, the literary editor at Flavorwire.com, a former associate editor at Men's Journal, and currently the sports editor at Rolling Stone. He has written for The New York Times, The Paris Review, Esquire, Harper's Bazaar, The Wall Street Journal, New Republic, Vice, Bookforum, Tablet, The Awl, Pitchfork, McSweeny's, NPR, The Rumpus, and many other fine outlets. His memoir, Searching For John Hughes (William Morrow/HarperCollins), was released in November 2016.



Rion Amilcar Scott’s work has been published in journals such as The Kenyon Review, Crab Orchard Review, PANK, The Rumpus, Fiction International, The Washington City Paper, The Toast, Akashic Books, Melville House and Confrontation, among others. He earned an MFA from George Mason University where he won both the Mary Roberts Rinehart award and a Completion Fellowship. He is a Kimbilio fellow. His short story collection, Insurrections (University Press of Kentucky) was published in August 2016 and was chosen for The Rumpus's Book Club and also the longlist for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction. Wolf Tickets is forthcoming from Tiny Hardcore Press. Presently, he teaches English at Bowie State University.


Katharine Noel currently teaches at the Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University. She has been the Writer in Residence at Claremont McKenna College and the Jones Lecturer at Stanford University, where she held Wallace Stegner and Truman Capote fellowships. Noel’s first novel, Halfway House, was a New York Times Editors' Choice and winner of a Ken/NAMI Award for "outstanding literary contributions to a better understanding of mental illness," and the 2006 Kate Chopin prize for fiction. She lives with her husband, the writer Eric Puchner, and their children in Baltimore, Maryland. Her second novel, Meantime, was just released by Grove Press.